How To Value Antique Teacups Like A Pro

 

You just inherited your grandmothers antique teacups, either you love them and use them, or you want to find out what they’re worth. Or Both! So you rush to clear space on a shelf to show them off to your friends and you wonder, “are these rare tea cups?!”

How To Value Antique Teacups

So you spend some time examining each cup, admiring the detail, with the hand painted letters and gold rimmed bottoms, but how do you get a sense of what they’re worth? Here’s how.

What did we EVER do before the internet! Your ticket to success here are two things Google and Ebay, and with a little digging just about every brushstroke and every bottom-stamped-teacup can be assessed and priced at the flick of your digital finger. So let’s get started!

How To Value Antique Teacups

1. Seems obvious but the first thing you need to do is brew some tea and get in the spirit!

2. Clear a table, put a towel down and separate your teacups from saucers to examine the stamp, lettering and number on the bottom. Absorb the image and get a clear picture of who made it, where it came from and write it down. And if there’s a person’s name like “Julia”, that’s the name of the pattern.

How To Value Antique Teacups

3. Take all that information you wrote down and Google it. Then Ebay it. See what comes up. If you’re lucky there’s a current listing for a teacup that’s similar to yours. If not Ebay also offers a ‘advanced search’ which allows you to search for auctions that have endend. Do that.

4. If you’ve searched and there are no images or references to this particular cup, your alternatives are to post something on the Ebay forum or try different search combinations of words – the time taken for this step is often overlooked

5. If you’ve made it to step #5 repeat step #4 one more time, and if you STILL haven’t found the cup you’re looking for, write us, we might have a few cards up our sleeve.

If your search fails don’t fret because at the end of your search if you still love the cup that’s all that matters. And if it was your grandmothers it is already valuable with family history. put it on a shelf proudly, it would make her happy!

Learn more about collecting antique teacups click here!

 

More Vintage Articles

1. How To Clean Old Silverware

2. Mom’s Top 5 Tips For Finding Great Vintage

Comments

  1. Juliann Giampaolo says

    I am one of those lucky ones who just inheritated two tea cups and saucers. I can not find anything like them on the web…Can i send a picture or can you offer additional help! Thanks!

  2. says

    I’m an author who’s written a novellas series based on vintage teacups. For my 5th book, I need a Christmas pattern that would have been available in the early 1940s. I feel like I’ve been all over the internet going in circles, having difficulty finding the exact date of manufacturing for any of them. Do you have any pattern suggestions?

    The closest I’ve come is this one below by Lefton, though my research shows that the Lefton China Company wasn’t founded until 1941. And I doubt a Christmas pattern would have been their first? But who knows.

    https://img1.etsystatic.com/007/0/6608029/il_570xN.404913887_s3kh.jpg

    Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated!
    Diane

    • Vintage Lover says

      I wish we knew more Diane, we will certainly keep our eyes peeled while hunting for any such patterns. Good luck!

  3. Sally Broadt says

    I have a teacup with G & H with a T below it and a cross behind it. Any ideas? That is the marking on the bottom of the saucer

    Sally

    • Vintage Lover says

      Hi Sally, I’m not entirely sure what those markings stand for however if you do some digging online you’re sure to come up with some answers. I suggest you also join a forum like the one described above where teacups lovers frequent. You’re sure to get some information that way. Good luck!

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